Discover the mysteries of Questacon’s moon

Posted 22 Feb 2019

Story by CBR Canberra

The Moon is closer than you think. In fact, aspiring astronauts don’t need to leave Earth’s orbit to see the majesty of the Moon up close thanks to Questacon’s out-of-this-world exhibition.

Gaze at the Moon from every angle as it glows brightly in Questacon’s newest gallery. Generating awe and wonder, this exhibition sparks curiosity in minds young and old. Starry-eyed fans asked the space experts at Questacon their most pressing questions.

How accurate is it?

The images on The Moon are from high-resolution photographs taken from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter camera, so very accurate.

How big is it?

The Moon exhibit at Questacon is 7 metres in diameter, making it about 1:500 000 scale. This means that 1 cm on The Moon exhibit is about 5 km on the Moon.

A lunar rover in Apollo 17 travelled the equivalent of 15 mm from its landing site in 1972 (7.6 km).

How long did it take to inflate?

The moon was inflated by a leaf blower through a zip at the top (you can see the zip from the top ramp). It took about 30 minutes to inflate.

How much does it weigh?

The Moon exhibit at Questacon weighs about 40 kg empty, and 100 kg when filled with air.

What’s it made of?

The Moon exhibit at Questacon is made of polyurethane coated nylon – similar to the material parachutes and hot-air balloons are made from.

Who designed and constructed it?

The Moon was designed and built by Luke Jerram, a UK artist based in Bristol.

The photographic imagery on the surface of The Moon exhibit was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter camera.

See The Moon up close for yourself at Questacon. Created as an oasis of calm in a sea of boundless enthusiasm, this exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Find out more at questacon.edu.au.

 

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