10 things not to miss at the Australian War Memorial

Posted 29 Mar 2017

Story by Visit Canberra

25 April, 2017 marks the 102nd  anniversary of the landing of the Anzacs at Gallipoli in 1915. The Australian War Memorial in Canberra is the place to remember all Australians who have served and died in war and on operational service, and to discover the meaning and relevance of this upon our national identity.

On the eve of Anzac Day, take the time to commemorate our servicemen and servicewomen who have served, at the Australian War Memorial.

Here are 10 things you won’t want to miss:

Mephisto

Come along to see Mephisto, the rarest tank in the world. After 70 years of exhibition in Queensland, the First World War German tank Mephisto has arrived at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. Learn how tanks like Mephisto revolutionised warfare in the First World War.

Afghanistan – the Australian story

Discover Australia’s involvement in our longest ongoing military conflict at the film screening of Afghanistan: The Australian Story.  Learn more about the challenges, successes, and comradeship experienced by the men and women who served in Afghanistan, as well as the joy, heartbreak, and dedication of those who waited at home for their loved ones.

You can watch this documentary at 11am, 24 April in the Bae Theatre.

Australia in the Great War

Discover the stories that formed our nation as you learn about Australia’s experience on Gallipoli and the Western Front, and in Sinai and Palestine.

Silver Star over Darwin

In early 1942 a young American pilot was stationed in Darwin. His actions at that time earned him the Silver Star, the United States military’s third-highest award for valour in combat. Join a curator from the Military Heraldry and Technology team to find out more about this distinctive medal and the unique place it holds in the Memorial’s collection.

Head along to the curator’s talk at 2.30pm, 24 April in the second World War galleries.

For Country, for Nation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stories of military service in times of war and peace are told in a new exhibition. For Country, For Nation draws inspiration from cultural traditions and symbols of the warrior’s discipline, knowledge, leadership, and skill

Middle East Exhibition

Take a deep dive into Australia’s involvement in the Middle East at the Middle East display. From the Gulf War through to Iraq and Afghanistan, this exhibition is comprised of over 220 items from the Memorial’s collection as well as items on loan from current and former Australian Defence Force personnel.

Roll of Honour

The names of those who have given their lives in war and other operations are recorded on bronze panels in the cloisters that surround the Memorial’s Commemorative area. It is customary to place a poppy – the symbol of remembrance – on the Roll of Honour to remember the ultimate sacrifice made by Australian servicemen and women.

The Deceiving Eye

Uncover the artistry involved in creating camouflage and story of the instrumental role Australian artist Frank Hinder played during the Second World War.

Last Post Ceremony

At the end of each day, commencing at 4.55 pm, the Memorial farewells visitors with its moving Last Post Ceremony. The ceremony begins with the singing of the National Anthem, followed by the poignant strains of a lament, played by a piper. Visitors are invited to lay wreaths and floral tributes beside the Pool of Reflection.  At each ceremony the story behind one of these names listed on the Roll of Honour is told. The Ode is then recited, and the ceremony ends with the sounding of the Last Post.

Image Projections

After the sun goes down on the 23 April, projections will commence onto the Memorial building of images of Australian servicemen and servicewomen drawn from the Memorial’s rich photographic collection. These projections will run again on 24 April until the commencement of the Dawn Service. From 4.30am on 25 April excerpts from letters and diaries will be read aloud by a representative from each of the armed forces.